Chatting And Laughing (Wine Coasters)

These useful, multipurpose discs make excellent little gifts. They are coasters that slip on a glasses stem base. They can be handy glass identifiers at gatherings, or use one to eliminate that unruly charging cord in your bag or pocket by putting the rolled phone cord inside.

Use speciality materials for different seasons or occasions, or just have fun with colour.

They are very inexpensive to make. If you or someone you know is a sewer they are a great way to use up scrape pieces of cotton, flannel, or felt.

Making these was another easy and quick project for our afternoon crafting get togethers.

Not everyone here has a sewing machine, so I suggested we stitch the Wine Coasters by hand. The decorative blanket stitch and all. It had been years since many of us opted to sew a project by hand. There were a few joking comments that I was torturing them, but it really wasn’t that bad. They don’t take long and we had fun.

Pictured is a 3pc. and a 5pc. style, and 2 sizes. The blue one is hand stitched and the smaller size.

Basic Steps

We used a CD as a template to cut the larger sized circles.

Cut 3 or 5 circles depending on the style you are making. (The 3pc. has a bottom and 2 top halves. The 5pc. has a bottom and 4 top pcs. showing quarters.)

With wrong sides together, fold in half and press the (2 or 4) pieces for your top.

Place your full bottom circle with right side of material facing downward.

For the 3pc. style, – place and pin your 2 folded pieces on your bottom circle, butting up the folded edge in the middle. Don’t overlap fold.

For the 5pc. style, – place a folded piece on one half of bottom circle. Then each next folded piece is placed a quarter of the way around the circle, covering half of the previous piece. Once all 4 are in place there should be a roughly pencil lead sized hole in the middle for stem to come through. Pin pieces in place. (This step sounds more difficult than it is.)

Next for either style, sew through all layers (.5cm or 1/4”) around the outside edge of circle

Turn right side out.

Press.

Optional – Top stitch around outer edge, with straight, zigzag, or blanket stitch. 

If you are interested in making these there’s also lots of pictures and detailed instructions on Pinterest. Just search, wine coasters or DIY wine coasters.

Tips

The CD sized 3 pc. style on a smaller based glass is a little loose fitting.

The CD 5 pc. style takes a few extra seconds to put on, but in my opinion fits better even on a smaller base.

I don’t think I would make the 5pc. style any smaller then a CD, it might be too hard to get on.

If possible, measure your bases before deciding which to make. Especially if making 3pc. style. Adjust the size of circles you cut according to your glasses base. (Cut roughly 1.5cm or 3/4” bigger than base to allow for seam and a little play.)

Do you or someone you know love to entertain and could use these?

Do you theme or decorate for your parties or get togethers?

People Say The Funniest Things

College

It’s not a big, beach inspired craft piece, and it doesn’t ooze restfulness or pop with vibrant colors. It’s no great work of art, but I did option two from, Art and a Glass House.

Funny things pictures have inspired people to say over the years caused me to pause before this college wall I finally got done in our bedroom.

On occasion, I too am guilty of blurting what pops to mind without realizing its silliness. It usually happens when I’m either comfortable with the company I’m in, or embarrassingly, when I’m nervous.

There are successful comedians whose routines reflect and feed off this action, so many of us must share the habit.

Innocent, spontaneous and uncensored comments can be far more real and entertaining as long as they’re not cruel.

I would never want family and friends to watch what they say or be correct in how they speak.

Our 8 x 10 enlarged wedding photo taken with a personal camera, has long since yellowed and has spurred comments like, “Wow that’s an old picture.” I’ve never said any following responses aloud, but I’ve thought them. Gee, could it be because it was framed over three decades ago? You would look old too if you’ve hung on the wall as long as it has.

I’ve been asked, “Is that you?” I certainly hope it’s me since the person is beside Mister and it’s our wedding picture.

“You look so young.” I hope I looked young in my twenties. Maybe they really mean, but are too polite to say, I look old now? Smiley face.

If you studied the wedding picture making your own judgments, you’re not seeing things, that is a stagecoach behind us. And no, that wasn’t the mode of transportation at the time. We were married in the saloon at Fort Edmonton historic park.

There are other photos in this collection that have received interesting remarks. One is a family shot when the kids were young. This I’ve actually heard more than once. “You had such a cute family.” Wait! What are they saying, we’re not cute anymore? Another smiley face.

Here’s one I’m sure everyone has heard. “Is that your family?” Wouldn’t you like to reply, “No,” once just to see their confusion. I could mess with them right now though with the picture frame I got for Christmas. Until I change it, it’s displaying a smiling store bought family.

Most times people don’t even realize they’ve said these things, and that’s part of what makes them funny.

It only took eight years, but every picture hanging on our walls which needed updating is done. I’m pleased, and the cottage feels homey.

Have you heard funny comments about a picture you have?

Art and a Glass House

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I love wall art with meaning, family or travel photos, or pictures or things you or someone you know make. Like this grouping of portraits I sketched of horses that Mister and I have owned and showed since together.

A hanging tribute that with a glance or simple passing, we can recall these treasured animals.

The poster size piece hangs on a wall at the country home where our daughter and husband live. Those fingers gripping the edge belong to her as we literally took an art walk through the house trying to find a spot to photograph it with the least glare.

A small, yet unfortunate issue for a picture lover like me, regarding the cottage where Mister and I live, is very limited wall space.

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County regulations when we built stipulated, not more than 12 inches of wall between windows in the main living area. For us that affected one whole side and the back, and is why I sometimes refer to it as, our glass house. (Now, you may also understand why I grumble when it comes to cleaning windows and blinds.) Blinds, I could rant for a whole post about my dislike for cleaning them and the dilemma of what other, if any, window covering option we might have. But we’ll leave that triad for another time.

The few big enough drywall areas are precious space, and they showcase art with meaning.

There are two current exceptions. One picture hangs in the bathroom, a boat and shoreline scene. The other, large one is of, chairs on a dock facing a sunset. It hung on the living room wall at first but is now in the master bedroom. Both pieces fit the decor but were store-bought as inexpensive space fillers when we first used the cottage as a weekend retreat.

It’s crazy, we’ve lived here full-time for eight years now and with how important wall space is to me those insignificant two still remain, simply because I can’t decide which pictures to replace them with. I tend to over-think and over-stress about this, but…I shrug my shoulders and smile.

After writing about this though, I will move changing them up in priority on my to-do-list.

We have many special photos, so I enjoy multi frames or frames with multiple spots, probably because of my indecisiveness when choosing favorite pictures. Smiley face.

pic cluster

This is another, “to-do-project,” update this cluster which hangs on the only sizable main living space wall.

I Just had a Light Bulb Moment.

I blog because I love to write, share stories, and enjoy the interaction of comments. Learning how to entertain, enlighten, inspire or inform a reader with my posts is a learning process, and I may not always succeed,

but

writing this post inspired one person, me.

I didn’t have a big, life changing ah-hah moment, but I’m pleased none the less.

Don’t laugh at my victory, but I finally realized why choosing a picture for our bedroom wall has taken years. It’s not the spot for one photo to be enlarged and framed.

The room needs a colorful piece, something beachy and crafty, or a collection of sorts there instead. I’ll update on this when the change takes place.

So my brain storming and searching will begin. Sounds like a great reason to spend time scrolling Pinterest. Not that I normally need an excuse.

Does what hangs on your walls have meaning?

Do you like artwork if so what type?

How Many is Too Many Lighthouses?

642 peggy's cove

Lighthouses, whether anchored on a rocky shoreline or perched high on a hillside ledge, tall or short ones, white, red, or striped, simple or with buildings attached, they fascinate me.

Built to endure, they stand through blistering heat and rugged storms. Their importance for men and women on the water is undeniable, and the lives they have saved makes them man-made heroes.

When we travel a coastal road, I’ll search our route in advance for these majestic landmarks. Mister, kindly feeds my obsession whenever possible, and we’ll stop and even take a slight detour so I can photograph a lighthouse. Getting close is sometimes an adventure though, and I promise to write a future post about one particular hair-raising experience.

Ornaments and accents in our family home had a definite country flare, but we left bronze horse statues and Western themed pieces behind when Mister retired and we moved.

How could I decorate a lake cottage, especially one with a turret that reminds people of a lighthouse, with such things? Yes, I know I could have.

I chose to go nautical, and in part, that gave the new phase in our life a fresh feel.

I’ve always loved sea shells, water creatures, sea horses and starfish. Unique pieces of driftwood or crafts made from driftwood. Boat anchors, steering wheels or anything related to boating. So now, ornaments, decor pieces, throw pillow covers, accent upholstery, it’s mainly nautical.

At last count and not including the few pieces outside, 41 lighthouses or things with lighthouses on them, have found a place inside our home. This is counting sets like, salt and pepper, cream and sugar bowls, or the four dining chairs only as one unit.

Does that sound like too many? Perhaps it’s somewhat of a fetish.

Not that it’s all you see when you step inside, but there is at least one lighthouse visible from any seat in the kitchen or living room, which is just one big room.

To me, I’ve kept their numbers and placement to a tasteful scattering, not an overpowering tackiness. Isn’t that what all people say about their collections, LOL.

kit 1See, just a few lighthouses tucked here and there with a side of nautical.

Other than furniture, most everything in our place is a travel souvenir or gift. Each item has an attached memory, and maybe one day I’ll write their little stories so when they are left behind someone, if interested, will now their history.

My decorating skills are minimal at best, and if I didn’t contain myself to a theme, my wide variety of likes would create a mismatched mess. Some people can make a collective style work, but I’m drawn to individual pieces and that can cloud the big picture.

Do you have a decorating theme or preferred style in your home, or an interest for certain collectables?

 

Interesting Lighthouse facts?

Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse pictured above is one of the most-photographed structures in Atlantic Canada and one of the most recognizable lighthouses in the world.

The first lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove was built in 1868. It was wooden with a beacon on the roof. In 1914 the current structure was erected, an eight sided reinforced concrete one that stands almost 49 feet (15 meters) high.

The older wooden lighthouse became the keepers dwelling until 1954 when Hurricane Edna damaged it and it was removed.

It was a treat for me to see Peggy’s Cove lighthouse in person.

Have you visited Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia?